Remote Warfare in Africa

Remote Warfare in Africa

 
Since 2014, the Remote Warfare programme has been tracking an emerging trend in conflict: the rise of “remote warfare”. Instead of placing their own soldiers on the frontlines of campaigns against groups like al Shabaab and Boko Haram, Western forces are increasingly working “by, with, and through” local and regional military groups. The African continent is a congested space for this sort of activity, with multiple overlapping unilateral, bilateral and multilateral efforts aimed at building stability, countering terrorist activity and building the capacity of local partners – often with little or no coordination.  This is having a detrimental impact on peace and security in many African countries; for instance, militarily focused assistance is empowering predatory state forces and uncoordinated tactical efforts are doing little to deal with the enduring political problems. Yet despite the risks of this approach, little holistic research is being conducted on it. This stream will examine the effect of modern warfare in Africa.
 
Organisers: Abigail Watson (Abigail.watson@oxfordresearchgroup.org.uk) and Megan Karlshoej-Pedersen (megan.karlshoej-pedersen@oxfordresearchgroup.org.uk)