STREAM: Muslim written intellectual tradition in Africa

STREAM: Muslim written intellectual tradition in Africa

The Muslim written intellectual tradition happened in Africa as in other parts of the Muslim world. Harar, Cairo, Fes, and Timbuktu are examples of centres of Islamic learning in Africa that contributed to this Muslim intellectual writing in Africa. (In the last decade, Timbuktu has become synonymous with Africa’s written intellectual tradition as a whole). Muslim intellectual writing in Africa covered Islamic law, history, language, theology, literature, medicine, politics, commerce, Sufism, exegesis, prophetic traditions, and a variety of other fields. It can tell us, for example, about history in Africa, the dialogues and polemics of Sufism and Sufis, Islamic law and rising developments, problems and challengers in pre-colonial and colonial regions in Africa. Much has been written on Islam and slavery in (especially West) Africa. However, hundreds of manuscripts from Timbuktu will give us new insights into how Muslim jurists navigated Islamic law to produce novel and innovative rulings on slavery in Islamic law. Likewise, Muslim chronicles leave us with a picture of scholars as ideological doers who wrote informed by the developments and dialectics of their day. The writings are invaluable sources to modern scholars of African Studies. To this end, we make a Call for Papers on Muslim intellectual writing in Africa, which will be delivered at the African Studies Association, United Kingdom meeting (ASAUK) in September, 2018.

If you have any queries or suggestions please contact Mathee Mohammed (smathee@uj.ac.za) and Bruce Hall (ouagadoo@yahoo.com). For panel and paper submissions please follow the instructions on the website  http://www.asauk.net/call-for-papers-and-panels-asauk-2018-now-open/ 

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